Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1

    No knowledge about HGH.



    I got on naps and they referred me here. I am looking to try some hgh. I see a ton of different choices. What is the difference in yellow, blue, gray, and black top hgh? they are all the same price.. Also, what is better, hygetropin or norvotrope? What kind of dosage should i be doing and for how long? my doctor said my growth plates are still open but won't be for too much longer. I am looking at trying a test booster as well. What advice do you have for that?


  2. #2



    You can delay closure, but I would ask my doctor and if he doesn't know or won't help ask your doctor to send you to a specialist.
    Abstract

    Aromatase inhibitors effectively delay epiphysial maturation in boys and improve testosterone levels in adult men Therefore, aromatase inhibitors may be used to increase adult height in boys with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty, idiopathic short stature and constitutional delay of puberty. Long-term efficacy and safety of the use of aromatase inhibitors has not yet been established in males, however, and their routine use is therefore not yet recommended.
    Go to:
    Background

    Over the past 15 years it has become evident that in men estradiol is responsible for a number of effects originally attributed to testosterone. Estradiol has an important role in gaining and maintaining bone mass, closing of the epiphyses and the feedback on gonadotropin secretion. This fact became particularly evident in men with aromatase deficiency. Aromatase is the enzyme responsible for conversion of androgens to estrogens. Men with estrogen deficiency caused by a mutation in the CYP19 gene suffer from low bone mineral density (BMD) and unfused epiphyses, and have high gonadotropin and testosterone levels [1]. Estrogen excess in turn has been associated with premature closure of the epiphyses, gynecomastia and low gonadotropin and testosterone levels. Lowering estrogen levels in men has emerged, consequently, as a potential treatment for a number of disorders including pubertas praecox, the andropause (also referred to as late-onset hypogonadism) and gynecomastia. Aromatase inhibitors were proven to be safe, convenient and effective for the treatment of hormone sensitive breast cancer in women although their use is associated with a modest increase in bone resorption [2,3]. This review will discuss the potential targets and the evidence for the use of aromatase inhibitors in men and adds more recent data to the text of an earlier review on this subject [4]. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3143915/


  3. #3



    You can delay closure, but I would ask my doctor and if he doesn't know or won't help ask your doctor to send you to a specialist.
    Abstract

    Aromatase inhibitors effectively delay epiphysial maturation in boys and improve testosterone levels in adult men Therefore, aromatase inhibitors may be used to increase adult height in boys with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty, idiopathic short stature and constitutional delay of puberty. Long-term efficacy and safety of the use of aromatase inhibitors has not yet been established in males, however, and their routine use is therefore not yet recommended.
    Go to:
    Background

    Over the past 15 years it has become evident that in men estradiol is responsible for a number of effects originally attributed to testosterone. Estradiol has an important role in gaining and maintaining bone mass, closing of the epiphyses and the feedback on gonadotropin secretion. This fact became particularly evident in men with aromatase deficiency. Aromatase is the enzyme responsible for conversion of androgens to estrogens. Men with estrogen deficiency caused by a mutation in the CYP19 gene suffer from low bone mineral density (BMD) and unfused epiphyses, and have high gonadotropin and testosterone levels [1]. Estrogen excess in turn has been associated with premature closure of the epiphyses, gynecomastia and low gonadotropin and testosterone levels. Lowering estrogen levels in men has emerged, consequently, as a potential treatment for a number of disorders including pubertas praecox, the andropause (also referred to as late-onset hypogonadism) and gynecomastia. Aromatase inhibitors were proven to be safe, convenient and effective for the treatment of hormone sensitive breast cancer in women although their use is associated with a modest increase in bone resorption [2,3]. This review will discuss the potential targets and the evidence for the use of aromatase inhibitors in men and adds more recent data to the text of an earlier review on this subject [4]. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3143915/


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •