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  1. #1

    SPECIAL REQUEST!!!! HGH breakdown - Please post In Laymans Terms?



    GM fellas..... Lately, I've been very curious about the overall benefits of HGH. I've read alot on the subject in here and through other sources outside of JM. Im 41 and have a few minor cycles under my belt, nothing to scream about though. Now with our sponsor having the different kinds(?) of HGH to purchase, I want to know all I can about it.

    Alot of you that are familiar with GH have some good posts on here but, maybe it's me, I cant grasp the differences of the compounds and the benefits to the body exactly. Its written over my head and I consider myself to be pretty quick to catch concepts. Can anyone post a full laymans terms "sticky" on HGH in general? It's a tall order to fill but I think it would help alot of us out, especially older guys like myself. The who, why, what, where, when and how of HGH.

    I research everything for at least 6 months before doing anything and this would be a great way to set guys up with the foundation of HGH use. I think thats why all of us call JM home because guys are here to help their fellow brothers to educate themselves and be responsible with the knowledge that they gain. Thanks guys again.
    "Stop Crying and Lift!!!!!"


  2. #2



    Quote Originally Posted by Mighty49er View Post
    GM fellas..... Lately, I've been very curious about the overall benefits of HGH. I've read alot on the subject in here and through other sources outside of JM. Im 41 and have a few minor cycles under my belt, nothing to scream about though. Now with our sponsor having the different kinds(?) of HGH to purchase, I want to know all I can about it.

    Alot of you that are familiar with GH have some good posts on here but, maybe it's me, I cant grasp the differences of the compounds and the benefits to the body exactly. Its written over my head and I consider myself to be pretty quick to catch concepts. Can anyone post a full laymans terms "sticky" on HGH in general? It's a tall order to fill but I think it would help alot of us out, especially older guys like myself. The who, why, what, where, when and how of HGH.

    I research everything for at least 6 months before doing anything and this would be a great way to set guys up with the foundation of HGH use. I think thats why all of us call JM home because guys are here to help their fellow brothers to educate themselves and be responsible with the knowledge that they gain. Thanks guys again.
    I'll give it a try on the blog..


  3. #3



    Thanks Ronny. I know its a tall order but I believe it would helped thousands of us to go about HGH safely and with a firm foundation.
    "Stop Crying and Lift!!!!!"


  4. #4



    Growth hormone (GH) is in its major form, a 22-kDa (22 kilodalton) protein consisting of 191 amino acids (in humans), and in its equally anabolic minority isoform, a 20-kDa protein consisting of the same structure with the deletion of 15 amino acids at positions 32 to 46 as well as dimers of these two forms, released by the pituitary and a member of a cascade of hormones that regulate the growth of the body and its organs. Various Fragments of the GH chain are also released and may undergo further cleavage into yet other fragments. The biological activity for most of the fragments are known yet their significance and "modes of action" remain to be elucidated.

    Secretion of growth hormone into the bloodstream is followed by binding to growth hormone receptor (GHR) on many cell and organ types. Growth hormone signaling is initiated and mediated by this interaction. Growth hormone signaling brings about the production of another hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I or IGF-1), which is produced in the liver, adipose tissue and kidney and secreted into the bloodstream. About 75% of serum IGF-I is produced in the liver in response to growth hormone stimulation. Many disorders are caused by and/or associated with elevated growth hormone levels and/or elevated IGF-I levels in plasma and/or tissues including acromegaly, gigantism, retinopathy, macular degeneration, nephropathy, diabetes and cancers. The role of IGF-I in mediating many growth hormone effects is well recognized and the interrelationship is referred to as the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I axis. In a normal feedback loop, IGF-I also causes the production of growth hormone by the pituitary to be reduced (i.e. negative feedback or inhibition).

    Growth hormone is produced and secreted by a set of specialized cells in the anterior pituitary. Growth hormone has direct and indirect effects on many tissues, such as stimulating bone and soft tissue growth and influencing carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism. Direct biological activities of growth hormone include receptor binding, internalization of the hormone/receptor complex, and activation of proteins involved in signal transduction.

    GH Receptor

    Protein and RNA transcripts for receptors of growth hormone (GHR) have been detected in many of the tissues influenced by the hormone. It was determined that a single molecule of growth hormone binds sequentially to two receptor molecules, forming an active complex. This complex, in turn, signals stimulation of other genes, including IGF-I. IGF-I, produced and secreted by the liver and other target tissues, mediates some of the indirect effects of growth hormone on growth and development. Other intracellular events occurring after the growth hormone/growth hormone receptor interaction include activation of tyrosine kinases such as Janus kinase 2 (Jak-2), which leads to phosphorylation and activation of other proteins including signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A and 5B (STAT 5A and 5B) and mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase that, in turn, activate other proteins and genes.

    The cDNA encoding the growth hormone receptor has been cloned from many species. The receptor consists of an extracellular hormone-binding region (exons 2-7), a single membrane spanning region (exon 8), and an intracellular region (exons 9-10). There are also multiple alternative 5' untranslated regions which are alternative first exons of the gene, in both the human and mouse transcripts. Growth hormone receptor has no intrinsic kinase domain, but the intracellular region plays a major role in the signal transduction process. A truncated form of the receptor, known as growth hormone binding protein (GHBP), lacks the transmembrane and intracellular regions of growth hormone receptor and is secreted into the serum. The truncated protein is produced by one of two different processes, depending on the animal species. In mice and rats, alternative splicing of growth hormone receptor precursor messenger RNA replaces the transmembrane and intracellular regions with a very short hydrophilic tail (encoded by exon 8A; 15, 16). In humans, cows, and pigs (among others), no alternative RNA splicing is apparent but instead the GHBP is produced by proteolysis of the growth hormone receptor. The function of the binding protein appears to be to modulate the level of circulating growth hormone.

    Growth hormone receptor is expressed in many organs and tissues including liver, adipose tissue, muscle, cartilage, bone, tooth, kidney, eye, cardiovascular system, gut, reproductive organs, skin, brain, endocrine system and immune system.

    The three-dimensional structure of the extracellular domain of growth hormone receptor has been established. It consists of two modules, each of about 100 amino acids, arranged as two sandwiches each with seven strands of beta-sheet. The secreted form of the extracellular domain of growth hormone receptor is the GHBP.

    The growth hormone receptor is biologically responsive to growth hormone stimulation. JAK2 is the primary effector molecule for growth hormone receptor signaling. JAK2 is activated post growth hormone receptor dimerisation. When the growth hormone dimerizes its receptors, the JAKs are brought close together, and with proper alignment transphosporylate each other, leading to full activation. The intracellular targets for the JAKs include tyrosine residues in the receptor cytoplasmic domain itself, which in turn activate SH2 domains (STATS, She and SHP2). These may go on to activate the MAP kinase pathway, which regulates cell proliferation. JAK2 also phosphorylates and activates other signaling molecules, such as IRS-1 and -2 and phosphatidyl 3-inositol kinase, which are important parts of the insulin signaling mechanism and may account for the insulin-like actions of growth hormone. Activated JAK2 also phosphorylates STATS, and when activated, is involved in the transcription of a number of genes.

    The Actions of GH Receptor Activation

    Growth hormone receptor activation leads to many actions in many organs including the following outcomes in the following organs:

    Liver:
    Increased secretion of insulin-like growth factor-I,
    synthesis of plasma proteins,
    regulation of nitrogen balance enzymes,
    increased carbohydrate synthesis/storage,
    and increased fat breakdown;
    Adipose Tissue:
    Breakdown of fat stores;
    Muscle:
    Increased protein synthesis,
    decreased protein breakdown;
    Cartilage:
    Increased height by increasing proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes in growth plate;
    Bone & Tooth:
    Increased turnover of tissue, both synthesis and breakdown;
    Kidney:
    Increased sodium, bicarbonate and water retention;
    Eye:
    increased retinal neovascularization;
    Cardiovascular:
    Hypertrophy,
    increased contractility,
    stroke volume,
    cardiac output;
    Gut:
    Hypertrophy,
    increased amino acid, sodium, calcium, phosphate and B12 uptake;
    Reproductive System:
    Increased sperm production and motility,
    increased accessory gland secretion in male,
    increased number of follicles and ovulation rate,
    increased follicular maturation rate,
    increased milk production;
    Skin:
    Increased skin thickness and strength,
    increased hair growth and thickness;
    Brain:
    Increased neuron proliferation and connectivity prenatally,
    increased myelin formation,
    improved long-term memory;
    Endocrine System:
    Increased insulin synthesis and secretion,
    increased adrenal steroidogenesis;
    Immune System:
    Increased immune cell proliferation,
    increased killing by monocytes, macrophages and NK cells,
    increased antibody production
    IGF-1

    Downstream from growth hormone receptor in the growth hormone signaling pathway are IGF-I and IGF-I receptor. The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are important in proliferation. In particular, IGF-I and IGF-2 are ubiquitous polypeptides each with potent mitogenic effects on a broad range of cells. Molecules of the insulin-like growth factor type are also known as "progression factors" promoting "competent" cells through DNA synthesis. The insulin-like growth factors act through a common receptor known as the Type I receptor or IGF-IR, which is tyrosine kinase linked.
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  5. #5
    Join Date: Mar 2011
    Location: MASS
    Posts: 1,442



    ^^ Dat - B - True, Liquid ^^ ,,

    more confusing info about GH;

    Pulsatile GH for bodybuilding

    Most people know that in regard to GH I believe pulsation is the superior approach.

    The following study focused on pulsatile versus continuous GH. The I.V. route was used and as you can clearly see in my comparison charts because it mimics a pulse clearly better then subcutaneous or intramusclular.

    At the time of the study GHRPs/GHRH were not so much studied. So do not take this study to demonstrate that intravenous is best rather focus on pulsation versus continuous.

    The following chart comes from a post here:
    GH response curve for small GH doses .27iu, .8iu & 1.6iu
    At the time GH 1mg = 2.7iu

    1iu = 370mcg

    So the doses used for this chart in a 100kg man approximate:
    6mcg/kg = 1.6iu
    3mcg/kg = .8iu
    1mcg/kg = .27iu



    Intravenous growth hormone: growth responses to patterned infusions in hypophysectomized rats, R. G. Clark, J.-O. Jansson, O. Isaksson and I. C. A. F. Robinson, Journal of Endocrinology (1985) 104, 53-61

    Young hypophysectomized rats were maintained with chronic indwelling i.v. cannulae attached via swivels to a multichannel pumping system programmed to deliver GH in a continuous or pulsatile pattern for several days.

    Continuous i.v. infusions of human GH for 5 days produced dose-dependent increases in body weight and tail length, without increasing food intake. A comparison of GH infusions by the s.c. or i.v. route showed that the direct i.v. route was threefold more effective.

    Pulsatile i.v. infusions of human or bovine GH at two doses (12 or 36 mu./day, eight pulses/day, 5-min duration, every 3 h) produced greater increases in body weight than continuous i.v. infusions of GH at the same daily dose.

    Continuous infusions of bovine GH produced a lower growth rate in the second of two consecutive 5-day treatment periods, whereas the responses to pulsatile GH did not diminish with time.

    Both body weight gain and long-bone growth were affected by the frequency of GH pulses; nine pulses per day were more effective than three pulses per day which in turn produced larger growth responses than one pulse per day.

    Keeping GH pulse frequency constant and varying pulse duration (4, 16 or 64 min) did not affect growth rates.

    In conclusion, long-term pulsatile i.v. infusions of GH mimic the endogenous secretory pattern, and are most effective when given at the physiologically appropriate pulse frequency.
    So from this study you can see continuous infusion creates desensitization greatly while pulsation does not.

    The frequency of pulses were the most important factor in increasing growth. 9 better then 3 better then 1 better then continuous. The duration of the pulse didn't matter so long as it was still viewed as a single pulse by the body.

    Anyway, although not a human study it is never-the-less one of the early ones among many that are instructive for bodybuilders.
    "GYM + JUICE"


  6. #6



    ..posted in the blog..


  7. #7



    Thanks Ronny T, Liquid and ODB!! Your help is much appreciated. The blog is right on the money Ronny!!!!!! I suggest any HGH newbies that want to get a good foundation on the peptides, to please read Ronny T's blog here at Juiced Muscle. It breaks it down step by step. If need be, Imma keep bumpin this post so all can see. Thanks guys!
    "Stop Crying and Lift!!!!!"


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